0893 001 - WURTH AIR-CONDITIONING DISINFECTANT

Chemwatch Independent Material Safety Data Sheet

Issue Date: 5-Jan-2010

NC317ECP

CHEMWATCH 7500-72

Version No:5

Section 1 - CHEMICAL PRODUCT AND COMPANY IDENTIFICATION

PRODUCT NAME

0893 001 - WURTH AIR-CONDITIONING DISINFECTANT

SYNONYMS

"Manufacturer's Code: 0893 001"

PROPER SHIPPING NAME

AEROSOLS

PRODUCT USE

■ Application is by spray atomisation from a hand held aerosol pack.
Used to disinfect refrigerated air conditioner systems.

SUPPLIER

Company: Wurth Pty Ltd                
Address:                              
4 Redwood Drive (abn 48 002 487 096)  
Dingley                               
VIC, 3172                             
AUS                                   
Telephone: +61 3 9552 9552            
Telephone: 1800 331 603               
Emergency Tel: 1300 657 765           
Fax: +61 3 9551 2994                  
                                      

Section 2 - HAZARDS IDENTIFICATION

STATEMENT OF HAZARDOUS NATURE

HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE. DANGEROUS GOODS. According to NOHSC Criteria, and ADG Code.

POISONS SCHEDULE

None

 

RISK SAFETY
■ Extremely flammable. ■ Keep away from sources of ignition. No smoking.
■ Harmful if swallowed. ■ Do not breathe gas/ fumes/ vapour/ spray.
■ Risk of serious damage to eyes. ■ Wear suitable protective clothing.
■ Risk of explosion if heated under confinement. ■ To clean the floor and all objects contaminated by this material use water.
■ Vapours may cause drowsiness and dizziness. ■ Keep away from food drink and animal feeding stuffs.
■ If swallowed IMMEDIATELY contact Doctor or Poisons Information Centre (show this container or label).
■ This material and its container must be disposed of as hazardous waste.

 

Section 3 - COMPOSITION / INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS

NAME CAS RN %
n- propanol 71-23-8 30-50
ethanol 64-17-5 10-30
benzyl C8- 18 alkyldimethylammonium chloride 63449-41-2 <0.1^
glyoxal 107-22-2 <0.05^
water 7732-18-5 NotSpec^
non- flammable propellant NotSpec

Section 4 - FIRST AID MEASURES

SWALLOWED

· Not considered a normal route of entry.
· If swallowed do NOT induce vomiting.
· If vomiting occurs, lean patient forward or place on left side (head-down position, if possible) to maintain open airway and prevent aspiration.
· Observe the patient carefully.
· Never give liquid to a person showing signs of being sleepy or with reduced awareness; i.e. becoming unconscious.
· Give water to rinse out mouth, then provide liquid slowly and as much as casualty can comfortably drink.
· Seek medical advice.

EYE

■ If aerosols come in contact with the eyes:
· Immediately hold the eyelids apart and flush the eye continuously for at least 15 minutes with fresh running water.
· Ensure complete irrigation of the eye by keeping eyelids apart and away from eye and moving the eyelids by occasionally lifting the upper and lower lids.
· Transport to hospital or doctor without delay.
· Removal of contact lenses after an eye injury should only be undertaken by skilled personnel.

SKIN

■ If solids or aerosol mists are deposited upon the skin:
· Flush skin and hair with running water (and soap if available).
· Remove any adhering solids with industrial skin cleansing cream.
· DO NOT use solvents.
· Seek medical attention in the event of irritation.

INHALED

■ If aerosols, fumes or combustion products are inhaled:
· Remove to fresh air.
· Lay patient down. Keep warm and rested.
· Prostheses such as false teeth, which may block airway, should be removed, where possible, prior to initiating first aid procedures.
· If breathing is shallow or has stopped, ensure clear airway and apply resuscitation, preferably with a demand valve resuscitator, bag-valve mask device, or pocket mask as trained. Perform CPR if necessary.
· Transport to hospital, or doctor.

NOTES TO PHYSICIAN

■ Treat symptomatically.
For acute or short term repeated exposures to ethanol:
·  Acute ingestion in non-tolerant patients usually responds to supportive care with special attention to prevention of aspiration, replacement of fluid and correction of nutritional deficiencies (magnesium, thiamine pyridoxine, Vitamins C and K).
· Give 50% dextrose (50-100 ml) IV to obtunded patients following blood draw for glucose determination.
· Comatose patients should be treated with initial attention to airway, breathing, circulation and drugs of immediate importance (glucose, thiamine).
· Decontamination is probably unnecessary more than 1 hour after a single observed ingestion. Cathartics and charcoal may be given but are probably not effective in single ingestions.
· Fructose administration is contra-indicated due to side effects.

Section 5 - FIRE FIGHTING MEASURES

EXTINGUISHING MEDIA

■ SMALL FIRE:
· Water spray, dry chemical or CO2
LARGE FIRE:
· Water spray or fog.

FIRE FIGHTING

· Alert Fire Brigade and tell them location and nature of hazard.
· May be violently or explosively reactive.
· Wear breathing apparatus plus protective gloves.
· Prevent, by any means available, spillage from entering drains or water course.
· If safe, switch off electrical equipment until vapour fire hazard removed.
· Use water delivered as a fine spray to control fire and cool adjacent area.
· DO NOT approach containers suspected to be hot.
· Cool fire exposed containers with water spray from a protected location.
· If safe to do so, remove containers from path of fire.
· Equipment should be thoroughly decontaminated after use.
When any large container (including road and rail tankers) is involved in a fire,
consider evacuation by  100  metres in all directions.

FIRE/EXPLOSION HAZARD

· Liquid and vapour are highly flammable.
· Severe fire hazard when exposed to heat or flame.
· Vapour forms an explosive mixture with air.
· Severe explosion hazard, in the form of vapour, when exposed to flame or spark.
· Vapour may travel a considerable distance to source of ignition.
· Heating may cause expansion or decomposition with violent container rupture.
· Aerosol cans may explode on exposure to naked flames.
· Rupturing containers may rocket and scatter burning materials.
· Hazards may not be restricted to pressure effects.
· May emit acrid, poisonous or corrosive fumes.
· On combustion, may emit toxic fumes of carbon monoxide (CO).
Combustion products include: carbon dioxide (CO2), other pyrolysis products typical of burning organic material.

FIRE INCOMPATIBILITY

· Avoid contamination with oxidising agents i.e. nitrates, oxidising acids, chlorine bleaches, pool chlorine etc. as ignition may result.

HAZCHEM

2YE

Personal Protective Equipment

Gas tight chemical resistant suit.

Section 6 - ACCIDENTAL RELEASE MEASURES

MINOR SPILLS

· Clean up all spills immediately.
· Avoid breathing vapours and contact with skin and eyes.
· Wear protective clothing, impervious gloves and safety glasses.
· Shut off all possible sources of ignition and increase ventilation.
· Wipe up.
· If safe, damaged cans should be placed in a container outdoors, away from all ignition sources, until 
  pressure has dissipated.
· Undamaged cans should be gathered and stowed safely.

MAJOR SPILLS

· Clear area of personnel and move upwind.
· Alert Fire Brigade and tell them location and nature of hazard.
· May be violently or explosively reactive.
· Wear breathing apparatus plus protective gloves.
· Prevent, by any means available, spillage from entering drains or water courses
· No smoking, naked lights or ignition sources.
· Increase ventilation.
· Stop leak if safe to do so.
· Water spray or fog may be used to disperse / absorb vapour.
· Absorb or cover spill with sand, earth, inert materials or vermiculite.
· If safe, damaged cans should be placed in a container outdoors, away from ignition sources, until pressure 
  has dissipated.
· Undamaged cans should be gathered and stowed safely.
· Collect residues and seal in labelled drums for disposal.

 

Personal Protective Equipment advice is contained in Section 8 of the MSDS.

Section 7 - HANDLING AND STORAGE

PROCEDURE FOR HANDLING

· DO NOT allow clothing wet with material to stay in contact with skin.
· Avoid all personal contact, including inhalation.
· Wear protective clothing when risk of exposure occurs.
· Use in a well-ventilated area.
· Prevent concentration in hollows and sumps.
· DO NOT enter confined spaces until atmosphere has been checked.
· Avoid smoking, naked lights or ignition sources.
· Avoid contact with incompatible materials.
· When handling, DO NOT eat, drink or smoke.
· DO NOT incinerate or puncture aerosol cans.
· DO NOT spray directly on humans, exposed food or food utensils.
· Avoid physical damage to containers.
· Always wash hands with soap and water after handling.
· Work clothes should be laundered separately.
· Use good occupational work practice.
· Observe manufacturer's storing and handling recommendations.
· Atmosphere should be regularly checked against established exposure standards to ensure safe working conditions are maintained.

SUITABLE CONTAINER

· Aerosol dispenser.
· Check that containers are clearly labelled.

STORAGE INCOMPATIBILITY

■ Alcohols
· are incompatible with strong acids, acid chlorides, acid anhydrides, oxidising and reducing agents.
· reacts, possibly violently, with alkaline metals and alkaline earth metals to produce hydrogen
· react with strong acids, strong caustics, aliphatic amines, isocyanates, acetaldehyde, benzoyl peroxide, chromic acid, chromium oxide, dialkylzincs, dichlorine oxide, ethylene oxide, hypochlorous acid, isopropyl chlorocarbonate, lithium tetrahydroaluminate, nitrogen dioxide, pentafluoroguanidine, phosphorus halides, phosphorus pentasulfide, tangerine oil, triethylaluminium, triisobutylaluminium
· should not be heated above 49 deg. C. when in contact with aluminium equipment.

STORAGE REQUIREMENTS

· Keep dry to avoid corrosion of cans. Corrosion may result in container perforation and internal pressure may eject contents of can.
· Store in original containers in approved flammable liquid storage area.
· DO NOT store in pits, depressions, basements or areas where vapours may be trapped.
· No smoking, naked lights, heat or ignition sources.
· Keep containers securely sealed. Contents under pressure.
· Store away from incompatible materials.
· Store in a cool, dry, well ventilated area.
· Avoid storage at temperatures higher than 40 deg C.
· Store in an upright position.
· Protect containers against physical damage.
· Check regularly for spills and leaks.
· Observe manufacturer's storing and handling recommendations.

Section 8 - EXPOSURE CONTROLS / PERSONAL PROTECTION

EXPOSURE CONTROLS

SourceMaterialTWA ppmTWA mg/m³STEL ppmSTEL mg/m³Notes
_________________________________________________________
Australia Exposure Standardsn-propanol (Propyl alcohol)200492250614Sk
Australia Exposure Standardsethanol (Ethyl alcohol)10001880

The following materials had no OELs on our records
• benzyl C8-18 alkyldimethylammonium chloride: CAS:63449-41-2 CAS:51668-62-3
• glyoxal: CAS:107-22-2
• water: CAS:7732-18-5

 

EMERGENCY EXPOSURE LIMITS

Material Revised IDLH Value (mg/m3) Revised IDLH Value (ppm)
n-propanol 800
ethanol 3,300 [LEL]
NOTES Values marked LEL indicate that the IDLH was based on 10% of the lower explosive limit for safety considerations even though the relevant toxicological data indicated that irreversible health effects or impairment of escape existed only at higher concentrations.

 

MATERIAL DATA

0893 001 - WURTH AIR-CONDITIONING DISINFECTANT:
   Not available

N-PROPANOL:
   ■ For n-propanol:
   IDLH Level: 800 ppm
   Odour threshold level: 0.13-30 ppm.
   Because n-propanol has the same biological effects as isopropanol but is less toxic, the TLV-TWA is intermediate between the limits for isopropyl alcohol and the butanols. Exposure at or below this limit is thought to protect the worker against the significant risk of narcosis and irritation.
   Odour Safety Factor(OSF)
   OSF=77 (n-PROPANOL).
   Exposed individuals are reasonably expected to be warned, by smell, that the Exposure Standard is being exceeded.
   Odour Safety Factor (OSF) is determined to fall into either Class A or B.
   The Odour Safety Factor (OSF) is defined as:
   OSF= Exposure Standard (TWA) ppm/ Odour Threshold Value (OTV) ppm
   Classification into classes follows:
   
   
Class OSF Description
A 550 Over 90% of exposed individuals are aware by smell that the Exposure Standard (TLV-TWA for example) is being reached, even when distracted by working activities
B 26-550 As "A" for 50-90% of persons being distracted
C 1-26 As "A" for less than 50% of persons being distracted
D 0.18-1 10-50% of persons aware of being tested perceive by smell that the Exposure Standard is being reached
E <0.18 As "D" for less than 10% of persons aware of being tested
. ETHANOL: ■ Sensory irritants are chemicals that produce temporary and undesirable side-effects on the eyes, nose or throat. Historically occupational exposure standards for these irritants have been based on observation of workers' responses to various airborne concentrations. Present day expectations require that nearly every individual should be protected against even minor sensory irritation and exposure standards are established using uncertainty factors or safety factors of 5 to 10 or more. On occasion animal no-observable-effect-levels (NOEL) are used to determine these limits where human results are unavailable. An additional approach, typically used by the TLV committee (USA) in determining respiratory standards for this group of chemicals, has been to assign ceiling values (TLV C) to rapidly acting irritants and to assign short-term exposure limits (TLV STELs) when the weight of evidence from irritation, bioaccumulation and other endpoints combine to warrant such a limit. In contrast the MAK Commission (Germany) uses a five-category system based on intensive odour, local irritation, and elimination half-life. However this system is being replaced to be consistent with the European Union (EU) Scientific Committee for Occupational Exposure Limits (SCOEL); this is more closely allied to that of the USA. OSHA (USA) concluded that exposure to sensory irritants can: · cause inflammation · cause increased susceptibility to other irritants and infectious agents · lead to permanent injury or dysfunction · permit greater absorption of hazardous substances and · acclimate the worker to the irritant warning properties of these substances thus increasing the risk of overexposure. For ethanol: Odour Threshold Value: 49-716 ppm (detection), 101 ppm (recognition) Eye and respiratory tract irritation do not appear to occur at exposure levels of less than 5000 ppm and the TLV-TWA is thought to provide an adequate margin of safety against such effects. Experiments in man show that inhalation of 1000 ppm caused slight symptoms of poisoning and 5000 ppm caused strong stupor and morbid sleepiness. Subjects exposed to 5000 ppm to 10000 ppm experienced smarting of the eyes and nose and coughing. Symptoms disappeared within minutes. Inhalation also causes local irritating effects to the eyes and upper respiratory tract, headaches, sensation of heat intraocular tension, stupor, fatigue and a need to sleep. At 15000 ppm there was continuous lachrymation and coughing.

 

PERSONAL PROTECTION

EYE

■ No special equipment for minor exposure i.e. when handling small quantities.

 OTHERWISE: For potentially moderate or heavy exposures:
·  Safety glasses with side shields.
· NOTE: Contact lenses pose a special hazard; soft lenses may absorb irritants and ALL lenses concentrate them.

HANDS/FEET

· No special equipment needed when handling small quantities.
· OTHERWISE:
·  For potentially moderate exposures:
· Wear general protective gloves, eg. light weight rubber gloves.
· For potentially heavy exposures:
· Wear chemical protective gloves, eg. PVC. and safety footwear.

OTHER

· The clothing worn by process operators insulated from earth may develop static charges far higher (up to 100 times) than the minimum ignition energies for various flammable gas-air mixtures. This holds true for a wide range of clothing materials including cotton.
· Avoid dangerous levels of charge by ensuring a low resistivity of the surface material worn outermost.
BRETHERICK: Handbook of Reactive Chemical Hazards.
No special equipment needed when handling small quantities.
OTHERWISE:
· Overalls.
· Skin cleansing cream.
· Eyewash unit.
· Do not spray on hot surfaces.

RESPIRATOR

■ Selection of the Class and Type of respirator will depend upon the level of breathing zone contaminant and the chemical nature of the contaminant. Protection Factors (defined as the ratio of contaminant outside and inside the mask) may also be important.

Breathing Zone Level ppm (volume) Maximum Protection Factor Half-face Respirator Full-Face Respirator
1000 10 A-AUS -
1000 50 - A-AUS
5000 50 Airline * -
5000 100 - A-2
10000 100 - A-3
100+ Airline**
* - Continuous Flow ** - Continuous-flow or positive pressure demand. The local concentration of material, quantity and conditions of use determine the type of personal protective equipment required. For further information consult site specific CHEMWATCH data (if available), or your Occupational Health and Safety Advisor.

ENGINEERING CONTROLS

■ General exhaust is adequate under normal conditions. If risk of overexposure exists, wear SAA approved respirator. Correct fit is essential to obtain adequate protection.

 Provide adequate ventilation in warehouse or closed storage areas.

 

Section 9 - PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES

APPEARANCE

■ Supplied as an aerosol pack. Contents under PRESSURE. Contains highly flammable hydrocarbon propellant.
Clear colourless liquid with an alcoholic odour; miscible with water.
Supplied in aerosol pack containing non-flammable propellant.

PHYSICAL PROPERTIES

Liquid.
Gas.
Mixes with water.

 

StateLiquidMolecular WeightNot Applicable
Melting Range (ºC)Not AvailableViscosityNot Available
Boiling Range (ºC)Not AvailableSolubility in water (g/L)Miscible
Flash Point (ºC)30 (solvent)pH (1% solution)Not Available
Decomposition Temp (ºC)Not AvailablepH (as supplied)7.0
Autoignition Temp (ºC)>360 (solvent)Vapour Pressure (kPa)Under pressure
Upper Explosive Limit (%)15.0 (solvent)Specific Gravity (water=1)0.77
Lower Explosive Limit (%)2.1 (solvent)Relative Vapour Density (air=1)Not Available
Volatile Component (%vol)60 (solvent)Evaporation RateFast

Section 10 - CHEMICAL STABILITY AND REACTIVITY INFORMATION

CONDITIONS CONTRIBUTING TO INSTABILITY

· Elevated temperatures.
· Presence of open flame.
· Product is considered stable.
· Hazardous polymerisation will not occur.

For incompatible materials - refer to Section 7 - Handling and Storage.

Section 11 - TOXICOLOGICAL INFORMATION

POTENTIAL HEALTH EFFECTS

ACUTE HEALTH EFFECTS

SWALLOWED

■ Accidental ingestion of the material may be harmful; animal experiments indicate that ingestion of less than 150 gram may be fatal or may produce serious damage to the health of the individual.
Not normally a hazard due to physical form of product.
Considered an unlikely route of entry in commercial/industrial environments.

EYE

■ If applied to the eyes, this material causes severe eye damage.
Not considered to be a risk because of the extreme volatility of the gas.

SKIN

■ There is some evidence to suggest that the material may cause moderate inflammation of the skin either following direct contact or after a delay of some time. Repeated exposure can cause contact dermatitis which is characterised by redness, swelling and blistering.
Spray mist may produce discomfort.
Open cuts, abraded or irritated skin should not be exposed to this material.

INHALED

■ Inhalation of vapours may cause drowsiness and dizziness. This may be accompanied by sleepiness, reduced alertness, loss of reflexes, lack of co-ordination, and vertigo.
Inhalation hazard is increased at higher temperatures.
Inhalation of high concentrations of gas/vapour causes lung irritation with coughing and nausea, central nervous depression with headache and dizziness, slowing of reflexes, fatigue and inco-ordination.
WARNING:Intentional misuse by concentrating/inhaling contents may be lethal.

CHRONIC HEALTH EFFECTS

■ When administered to rats by intubation (0.3 ml/kg twice each week for a total dosage of 50 ml) n-propanol produced severe liver injury and hyperplasia, malignant tumours (myeloid leukaemia, liver sarcomas, liver cell carcinoma) and benign tumours. When administered by subcutaneous injection an increased incidence of malignant and benign tumours was recorded.
Principal routes of exposure are by accidental skin and eye contact and by inhalation of vapours especially at higher temperatures.

TOXICITY AND IRRITATION

■ Not available. Refer to individual constituents.

N-PROPANOL:
■ unless otherwise specified data extracted from RTECS - Register of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances.

TOXICITY IRRITATION
Oral (woman) LDLo: 5700 mg/kg Skin (rabbit): 500 mg Open Mild
Oral (rat) LD50: 1870 mg/kg Skin (rabbit): 20 mg/24h Moderate
Dermal (rabbit) LD50: 5040 mg/kg Eye (rabbit): 4 mg Open SEVERE
Eye (rabbit): 20 mg/24h Moderate
■ The material may produce severe irritation to the eye causing pronounced inflammation. Repeated or prolonged exposure to irritants may produce conjunctivitis. The material may cause skin irritation after prolonged or repeated exposure and may produce on contact skin redness, swelling, the production of vesicles, scaling and thickening of the skin. ETHANOL: ■ unless otherwise specified data extracted from RTECS - Register of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances.
TOXICITY IRRITATION
Oral (rat) LD50: 7060 mg/kg Skin (rabbit):20 mg/24hr-Moderate
Oral (human) LDLo: 1400 mg/kg Skin (rabbit):400 mg (open)-Mild
Oral (man) TDLo: 50 mg/kg Eye (rabbit):100mg/24hr-Moderate
Oral (man) TDLo: 1.40 mg/kg Eye (rabbit): 500 mg SEVERE
Oral (woman) TDLo: 256 mg/kg/12 wks
Inhalation (rat) LC50: 20,000 ppm/10h
Inhalation (rat) LC50: 64000 ppm/4h
■ The material may cause skin irritation after prolonged or repeated exposure and may produce on contact skin redness, swelling, the production of vesicles, scaling and thickening of the skin.

 

CARCINOGEN

Ethanol in alcoholic beveragesInternational Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) - Agents Reviewed by the IARC MonographsGroup1

SKIN

n-propanolAustralia Exposure Standards - SkinNotesSk

 

Section 12 - ECOLOGICAL INFORMATION

Refer to data for ingredients, which follows:

0893 001 - WURTH AIR-CONDITIONING DISINFECTANT:
ETHANOL:
N-PROPANOL:
■ DO NOT discharge into sewer or waterways.

0893 001 - WURTH AIR-CONDITIONING DISINFECTANT:
Marine Pollutant:  Not Determined

N-PROPANOL:
■ Algae IC50 (72hr.) (mg/l):   255- 3100
■ log Kow (Sangster 1997):     0.25
■ log Pow (Verschueren 1983):  0.34
■ BOD5:                        0.47- 1.05
■ ThOD:                        2.4

■ For n-propanol:
log Kow  : 0.25-0.34
Half-life (hr) air  : 6.7
Half-life (hr) H2O surface water  : 6.5
Henry's atm m3 /mol: 6.85E-06
BOD 5: 1.43-1.6 g O2/g
BOD 20: <2 g O2/g
COD  : 91%
ThOD  : 1.8 g O2/g
BCF  : 0.7
Ecological information:
High biochemical oxygen demand and a potential to cause oxygen depletion in aqueous systems, a low potential to affect aquatic organisms, a low potential to affect secondary waste treatment microbial metabolism.
n-Propanol is expected to biodegrade and is not expected to persist for long periods in aquatic environments. When diluted with a large amount of water, n-propanol is not expected to have a significant impact.

ETHANOL:
■ Fish LC50 (96hr.) (mg/l):                                             13480
■ Algae IC50 (72hr.) (mg/l):                                            1450
■ log Kow (Sangster 1997):                                              - 0.3
■ BOD5:                                                                 63%
■ ThOD:                                                                 2.1
■ Half- life Soil - High (hours):                                       24
■ Half- life Soil - Low (hours):                                        2.6
■ Half- life Air - High (hours):                                        122
■ Half- life Air - Low (hours):                                         12.2
■ Half- life Surface water - High (hours):                              26
■ Half- life Surface water - Low (hours):                               6.5
■ Half- life Ground water - High (hours):                               52
■ Half- life Ground water - Low (hours):                                13
■ Aqueous biodegradation - Aerobic - High (hours):                      26
■ Aqueous biodegradation - Aerobic - Low (hours):                       6.5
■ Aqueous biodegradation - Anaerobic - High (hours):                    104
■ Aqueous biodegradation - Anaerobic - Low (hours):                     26
■ Aqueous biodegradation - Removal secondary treatment - High (hours):  67%
■ Photooxidation half- life water - High (hours):                       3.20E+05
■ Photooxidation half- life water - Low (hours):                        8020
■ Photooxidation half- life air - High (hours):                         122
■ Photooxidation half- life air - Low (hours):                          12.2

■ When ethanol is released into the soil it readily and quickly biodegrades but may leach into ground water; most is lost by evaporation. When released into water the material readily evaporates and is biodegradable.
Ethanol does not bioaccumulate to an appreciable extent.
The material is readily degraded by reaction with photochemically produced hydroxy radicals; release into air will result in photodegradation and wet deposition.
Environmental Fate:
TERRESTRIAL FATE: An estimated Koc value of 1  indicates that ethanol is expected to have very high mobility in soil. Volatilisation of ethanol from moist soil surfaces is expected to be an important fate process given a Henry's Law constant of 5X10-6 atm-m3/mole. The potential for volatilization of ethanol from dry soil surfaces may exist based upon an extrapolated vapor pressure of 59.3 mm Hg Biodegradation is expected to be an important fate process for ethanol based on half-lives on the order of a few days for ethanol in sandy soil/groundwater microcosms
AQUATIC FATE: An estimated Koc value of 1 indicates that ethanol is not expected to adsorb to suspended solids and sediment. Volatilisation from water surfaces is expected based upon a Henry's Law constant of 5X10-6 atm-m3/mole. Using this Henry's Law constant and an estimation method, volatilisation half-lives for a model river and model lake are 3 and 39 days, respectively.An estimated BCF= 3, from a log Kow of -0.31 suggests bioconcentration in aquatic organisms is low. Hydrolysis and photolysis in sunlit surface waters is not expected to be an important environmental fate process for ethanol since this compound lacks functional groups that hydrolyse or absorb light under environmentally relevant conditions. Ethanol was degraded with half-lives on the order of a few days in aquatic studies conducted using microcosms constructed with a low organic sandy soil and groundwater, indicating it is unlikely to be persistent in aquatic environments(8).
ATMOSPHERIC FATE: Ethanol, which has an extrapolated vapor pressure of 59.3 mm Hg at 25 deg C, is expected to exist solely as a vapor in the ambient atmosphere. Vapor-phase ethanol is degraded in the atmosphere by reaction with photochemically-produced hydroxyl radicals; the half-life for this reaction in air is estimated to be 5 days, calculated from its rate constant of 3.3X10-12 m3/molecule-sec at 25 deg C.
Ecotoxicity:
log Kow  : -0.31- -0.32
Half-life (hr) air  : 144
Half-life (hr) H2O surface water  : 144
Henry's atm m3 /mol: 6.29E-06
BOD 5 if unstated: 0.93-1.67,63%
COD  : 1.99-2.11,97%
ThOD  : 2.1.

Ecotoxicity

IngredientPersistence: Water/SoilPersistence: AirBioaccumulationMobility
n-propanolLOWLOWHIGH
ethanolLOWMEDLOWHIGH

 

Section 13 - DISPOSAL CONSIDERATIONS

■ Legislation addressing waste disposal requirements may differ by country, state and/ or territory. Each user must refer to laws operating in their area. In some areas, certain wastes must be tracked.
A Hierarchy of Controls seems to be common - the user should investigate:
· Reduction,
· Reuse
· Recycling
· Disposal (if all else fails)
This material may be recycled if unused, or if it has not been contaminated so as to make it unsuitable for its intended use. If it has been contaminated, it may be possible to reclaim the product by filtration, distillation or some other means. Shelf life considerations should also be applied in making decisions of this type. Note that properties of a material may change in use, and recycling or reuse may not always be appropriate.
· DO NOT allow wash water from cleaning or process equipment to enter drains.
· It may be necessary to collect all wash water for treatment before disposal.
· In all cases disposal to sewer may be subject to local laws and regulations and these should be considered first.
· Where in doubt contact the responsible authority.
· Consult State Land Waste Management Authority for disposal.
· Discharge contents of damaged aerosol cans at an approved site.
· Allow small quantities to evaporate.
· DO NOT incinerate or puncture aerosol cans.
· Bury residues and emptied aerosol cans at an approved site.

Section 14 - TRANSPORTATION INFORMATION

Labels Required: FLAMMABLE GAS

HAZCHEM:

	  2YE  (ADG7)

ADG7:

Class or division: 2 Subsidiary risk: None
UN No.: 1950 UN packing group: None
Special provisions: 63, 190, 277, 327 Packing Instructions: None
Notes: None Limited quantities: See SP 277
Portable tanks and bulk containers - Instructions: None Portable tanks and bulk containers - Special provisions: None
Packagings and IBCs - Packing instruction: P003, LP02 Packagings and IBCs - Special packing provisions: PP17, PP87, L2
Shipping Name:AEROSOLS

Land Transport UNDG:

Class or division: 2 Subsidiary risk: None
UN No.: 1950 UN packing group: None
Shipping Name:AEROSOLS

Air Transport IATA:

ICAO/IATA Class: 2.1 ICAO/IATA Subrisk: None
UN/ID Number: 1950 Packing Group: -
Special provisions: A145
Shipping Name: AEROSOLS, FLAMMABLE

Maritime Transport IMDG:

IMDG Class: 2.1 IMDG Subrisk: SP63
UN Number: 1950 Packing Group: None
EMS Number: F-D,S-U Special provisions: 63 190 277 327 959
Limited Quantities: See SP277 Marine Pollutant: Not Determined
Shipping Name: AEROSOLS

Section 15 - REGULATORY INFORMATION

POISONS SCHEDULE

None

REGULATIONS

Regulations for ingredients

n-propanol (CAS: 71-23-8) is found on the following regulatory lists;

"Australia Exposure Standards","Australia Hazardous Substances","Australia High Volume Industrial Chemical List (HVICL)","Australia Inventory of Chemical Substances (AICS)","GESAMP/EHS Composite List of Hazard Profiles - Hazard evaluation of substances transported by ships","IMO IBC Code Chapter 17: Summary of minimum requirements","IMO MARPOL 73/78 (Annex II) - List of Noxious Liquid Substances Carried in Bulk","IMO Provisional Categorization of Liquid Substances - List 2: Pollutant only mixtures containing at least 99% by weight of components already assessed by IMO","OECD Representative List of High Production Volume (HPV) Chemicals"

ethanol (CAS: 64-17-5) is found on the following regulatory lists;

"Australia Exposure Standards","Australia Hazardous Substances","Australia High Volume Industrial Chemical List (HVICL)","Australia Illicit Drug Reagents/Essential Chemicals - Category III","Australia Inventory of Chemical Substances (AICS)","Australia National Pollutant Inventory","Australia Standard for the Uniform Scheduling of Drugs and Poisons (SUSDP) - Schedule 5","GESAMP/EHS Composite List of Hazard Profiles - Hazard evaluation of substances transported by ships","IMO IBC Code Chapter 18: List of products to which the Code does not apply","IMO MARPOL 73/78 (Annex II) - List of Other Liquid Substances","IMO Provisional Categorization of Liquid Substances - List 2: Pollutant only mixtures containing at least 99% by weight of components already assessed by IMO","International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) - Agents Reviewed by the IARC Monographs","International Air Transport Association (IATA) Dangerous Goods Regulations","International Council of Chemical Associations (ICCA) - High Production Volume List","OECD Representative List of High Production Volume (HPV) Chemicals"

No data for 0893 001 - Wurth Air-Conditioning Disinfectant (CW: 7500-72)

Section 16 - OTHER INFORMATION

INGREDIENTS WITH MULTIPLE CAS NUMBERS

Ingredient Name CAS
benzyl C8-18 alkyldimethylammonium chloride 63449-41-2, 51668-62-3

 

REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH GUIDELINES

■ Established occupational exposure limits frequently do not take into consideration reproductive end points 
that are clearly below the thresholds for other toxic effects. Occupational reproductive guidelines (ORGs) 
have been suggested as an additional standard. These have been established after a literature search for the 
reproductive no-observed-adverse effect-level (NOAEL) and the lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level (LOAEL). 
In addition the US EPA's procedures for risk assessment for hazard identification and dose-response 
assessment as applied by NIOSH were used in the creation of such limits. Uncertainty factors (UFs) have also 
been incorporated.
Ingredient ORG UF Endpoint CR Adeq TLV
ethanol 1880 mg/m3 NA NA NA Yes
■ These exposure guidelines have been derived from a screening level of risk assessment and should not be construed as unequivocally safe limits. ORGS represent an 8-hour time-weighted average unless specified otherwise. CR = Cancer Risk/10000; UF = Uncertainty factor: TLV believed to be adequate to protect reproductive health: LOD: Limit of detection Toxic endpoints have also been identified as: D = Developmental; R = Reproductive; TC = Transplacental carcinogen Jankovic J., Drake F.: A Screening Method for Occupational Reproductive American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal 57: 641-649 (1996).

 

■ Classification of the preparation and its individual components has drawn on official and authoritative sources as well as independent review by the Chemwatch Classification committee using available literature references.
A list of reference resources used to assist the committee may be found at:
www.chemwatch.net/references.

 

■ The (M)SDS is a Hazard Communication tool and should be used to assist in the Risk Assessment. Many factors determine whether the reported Hazards are Risks in the workplace or other settings. Risks may be determined by reference to Exposures Scenarios. Scale of use, frequency of use and current or available engineering controls must be considered.

 

This document is copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purposes of private study, research, review or
criticism, as permitted under the Copyright Act, no part may be reproduced by any process without written
permission from CHEMWATCH. TEL (+61 3) 9572 4700.

 

Issue Date: 5-Jan-2010

Print Date: 5-Jan-2010

 

 

This is the end of the MSDS.